4 Points For Big Toe Pain (Part 1)

Big toe (hallux) pain occurs in a significant number of people at some point in their lives.  Not only affecting athletes, hallux pain also includes the sedentary population to a significant degree.  Early assessment and treatment of big toe pain is important in preventing long-term damage and chronic reinjury.

Although hallux pain triggers are various, this article will be focused on pain due to stress and strain on the joint due to the surrounding musculature.  If hallux pain is mainly located on the plantar (bottom) side of the foot, the four points found here may help provide significant relief.  These simple points can be manipulated oneself or treated by a skilled massage therapist or licensed acupuncturist.

Point 1 –  Abductor hallucis muscle.  This muscle is responsible for plantar flexion of the hallux and some medial deviation (hallux varus) of the proximal phalanx (big toe points away from other toes).  The abductor hallucis gives structure to the medial arch of the foot as well.  Tight abductor hallucis muscles can be easily mistaken for plantar fasciitis pain.  A notable distinction is that this pain is typically concentrated along the medial arch of the foot between the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint and the calcaneous (heel).  [See Figure 1 for treatment location.]

Point 2 –  Adductor hallucis muscle.  Compared to abductor hallucis, this muscle similarly plantar flexes the big toe, but laterally deviates (hallux valgus) the proximal phalanx (big toe points toward other toes).  The opposing forces of the adductor hallucis and abductor hallucis provide stabilization of the hallux in the transverse plane.  Severe lateral deviation of the proximal phalanx is sometimes referred to as a bunion. The adductor hallucis pain is typically concentrated on the lateral edge of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint and can spread to an area beneath the 2nd through 5th metatasophalangeal joints. This muscle is considered a deep foot muscle and will require adequate pressure for stimulation.  [See Figure 1 for treatment location.]

Point 3 –  Flexor Hallucis Brevis muscle.  The flexor hallucis brevis shares some of the function of both the abductor and adductor hallucis muscles.  Pain caused by the flexor hallucis brevis is mainly located around the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint.  This muscle is considered a deep foot muscle and will require adequate pressure for stimulation. [See Figure 1 for treatment location.]

1 - Abductor hallucis; 2 - adductor hallucis; 3 - flexor hallucis brevis

(Figure 1)  1 – Abductor hallucis; 2 – Adductor hallucis; 3 – Flexor hallucis brevis

Point 4 –  Flexor Hallucis Longus muscle.  This muscle is located outside the foot and is thus known as an extrinsic foot muscle.  It resides in the lower leg behind the soleus muscle and attaches to the fibula.  The flexor hallucis longus is a comparably large plantar flexor of the hallux and is thus responsible for strong plantar flexion of the big toe, especially during walking and running.  This muscle is one of the most important muscles to treat in big toe pain and due to its remote location, one of the least addressed.  Since this muscle is deep to the soleus, adequate pressure is necessary for proper treatment of the flexor hallucis longus.  [See Figure 2 for treatment location.]

Figure 2 - Flexor Hallucis Longus

(Figure 2) 4 – Flexor hallucis longus

In any painful foot condition, treat the musculature and soft tissue first.  Tight muscles will continuously pull on joints and elicit pain.  This common occurrance is often overlooked in sourcing joint pain.  Intolerance to orthotics may be a sign that the muscles in the foot are causing pain or problems associated with the big toe and foot.  Before seeking out orthotics, one should have the surrounding musculature checked for tender trigger points and sensitivity.  Orthotics typically solve structural problems of the foot and should not be used until all of the functional components (i.e. muscles, tendons, fascia) have been treated for some length of time.  Calf cramps, foot cramps, poor circulation in the lower extremities are other signs that muscular problems in the feet are occuring.  This functional approach to medicine can save hundreds to thousands of dollars in expenses and can circumvent more invasive procedures, such as surgery.

A simple, effective tool in maintaining the functional ability of the hallux is a rubber ball.  Roll each foot over a ball for 5 minutes a day, spending a minute or more on each of the points listed above.  Sit on the floor with legs straight out and place the ball under #4.  The weight of the lower leg may provide enough pressure to stimulate the flexor hallucis longus.  If not, cross the other leg over top of the leg being treated to increase the weight.  This procedure should be followed 4-5 days a week for a couple of months to allow the muscle spasms and tightness to abate.  This is an excellent way to promote good blood circulation, massage intrinsic foot muscles, stimulate nerve endings, and refresh tired, worn out feet.

August Point Wellness offers a self-massage tool called the Sciaticare Ball that is quite a bit more useful than the rubber ball stated previously.  The Sciaticare Ball can be used on feet, calves, back, hips, and much more.  With an easy to place handle, it allows better control in massaging those hard to reach places.  Visit www.augustpoint.com or Amazon to purchase.  As always, for best results, seek out the guidance of a licensed massage therapist or acupuncturist and combine professional treatment with self-treatment for optimal health.

Related links:

Big Toe Pain…And Gout is NOT the Diagnosis

Barefoot Running? Refresh Your Feet With the Sciaticare Ball!

English: Vibram FiveFingers Bikila shoes, top ...

Image via Wikipedia

There’s somewhat of a craze going on right now about barefoot running and how great it is for the feet.  Barefoot running is somewhat of a misnomer (thanks in part to the loose interpretation of the term by marketing and advertising execs) in that some of the so-called “barefoot runners” are not really barefoot.  The better terms used for barefoot running is minimalist running, or natural running.  The runner wears minimal cushion beneath the soles of their feet, but only to protect from road debris and small particles that can damage skin.  Some benefits of barefoot running show persons experiencing lower magnitude impact thus erasing back pain and knee pain after just a few months of exercise.

There is no doubt that running barefoot can build foot and lower leg strength.  But, it can also be hard on the feet for the first few weeks of adaptation.  To ease the transition from standard shoes to the minimalist style of footwear, we have some tools that are sure to help you maintain your foot health with any type of footwear.

The foot is a complex structure built to withstand enormous forces from impact on a multitude of surfaces.  The muscles, tendons, and ligaments that hold and support the dynamic shape of the foot allow for weight distribution, balance, and propulsion.  Since the plantar side of the foot is the part that strikes the ground in most activities, it  is important to keep this impact zone healthy and supple.  One excellent way to do this is to schedule regular foot treatments, such as massage, acupuncture, and/or foot reflexology.  (As you may already know, there are plenty of nerve endings in the foot that can be stimulated and balanced through these types of therapies.)

Benefits of having regular treatments to you feet are:

  • early detection of structural problems
  • stimulate nerve endings and “wake” them up
  • improve balance and proprioception
  • prevent/treat tendinitis
  • prevent/treat ligament strain
  • improve circulation
  • reduce edema and swelling

To help you make the transition from standard running shoes to minimalist shoes (or barefoot), August Point Wellness offers the Sciaticare Ball.  The Sciaticare Ball is our multipurpose therapy tool created by a massage therapist and acupuncturist.  It can be used as a standalone treatment or in conjunction with your current health care.  Use the Sciaticare Ball to massage the plantar side of the foot.  Roll your feet over the Sciaticare Ball to firmly massage the deep musculature under the entire foot.  Use it every day after you run.  Spend just 5 minutes rolling the Ball under the three arches of the foot and enhance your foot health and recovery.  Feel your feet rejuvenate themselves.  

August Point Wellness also offers another great product, the Sciaticare Penetrating Muscle Rub.  The Sciaticare Penetrating Muscle Rub is a unique formula based on traditional herbal Chinese Medicine.  Great for muscle strains, tendon sprains, bone bruises, and fractures, this warming rub can work wonders for your feet as well as your entire body.  For those aching, sore feet and calves, rub the Sciaticare PMR into the skin and allow the natural herbs and oils to deeply penetrate into the skin without any harsh chemicals or artificial ingredients.  Another benefit of the Sciaticare Penetrating Muscle Rub is the herbal formula’s antifungal and antibacterial properties.

For more information about the Sciaticare brand, please visit the August Point Wellness website.

Big Toe Pain…And Gout is NOT the Diagnosis.

Dorsal and plantar aspects of foot

Image via Wikipedia

The big toe (hallux) is vital to ensuring humans continue to walk upright.  The strongest of all of the toes, it is also the largest one on each foot.  Needless to say, the halluces are probably the most important toes of all. Problems that can occur with each hallux may cause numbness, tingling, weakness, stiffness, etc., in and around the area of the big toe. With any combination of these symptoms, walking upright can become difficult.

If you think gout is the only reason for a painful big toe, think again.  Before you decide that your diet needs adjusting and you need a full blood panel done, first address the musculature supporting the hallux.  There are seven important muscles that attach and provide movement to the big toe.  Flexor hallucis longus, flexor hallucis brevis, extensor hallucis longus, and tibialis anterior are all extrinsic (outside foot) hallux muscles.  Extensor hallucis brevis, abductor hallucis, and adductor hallucis are the three intrinsic (inside foot) hallux muscles.  I’ve also included an eighth muscle, tibialis posterior, as one that can cause pain in and around the big toe although it doesn’t have a tendinous attachment to the hallux bones as the other muscles do.

On the underside of the foot, at the base of the big toe, a tight adductor hallucis may exhibit pain in this area.  Both flexor hallucis longus and brevis can cause pain and numbness in the underside of the big toe.  Abductor hallucis usually causes pain on the inside of the heel, and if this muscle is tight enough, there is accompanying pain beneath the first metatarsal.  Tibialis posterior can cause pain at the base of the big toe, but this muscle may also show pain in the Achilles region of the lower leg.

If the top of the hallux is painful, the muscles that dorsiflex (or extend) the big toe could be the offending party.  The muscles that dorsiflex the big toe are the tibialis anterior, extensor hallucis longus, and extensor hallucis brevis.  Tibialis anterior will generate pain or tenderness in the shin as well as pain on the dorsum of the foot.  Pain caused by the extensor hallucis longus may be felt in the front of the ankle as well as on top of the big toe.  Extensor hallucis brevis will only cause pain in the location of the muscle, at the top of foot near the base of the first metatarsal.  Check all three of these muscles when pinpointing the cause of your toe pain.

To treat your stiff, tight, aching muscles, seek out your favorite acupuncturist and/or massage therapist.  Also, try a warm foot soak in Epsom salt to help relax muscles further.  Follow up your foot soak with easy stretching for both the intrinsic and extrinsic foot muscles.  In conjunction with professional care, you can self-treat your muscles with the Sciaticare Ball by August Point Wellness.  Roll your foot over the Sciaticare Ball to treat the acupressure and trigger points on the underside of the foot.  Rolling the entire plantar side of your foot will do wonders to treat the many small, hardworking muscles that ache from continued walking, running, etc.  The Sciaticare Ball can also treat the tibialis anterior and can address other extrinsic muscles in the lower leg.  A regular care plan should include visits to your practitioner as well as self-care.  For your self-care, we highly recommend the Sciaticare Ball.  Visit our website to learn more about the Sciaticare Ball and how you can rid yourself of big toe pain.

Related Links:

4 Points For Big Toe Pain (Part 1)